3 Essential Rules For Successful Negotiating

Do you realize that we engage in some form or negotiation every day of our lives? Surprised? Think about it! Did you have to convince your kids to do their home work last night and get ready for school this morning? Did you discuss with your spouse who was going to make dinner tonight? Did you set completion goals for a new project at work? Did you talk with a disgruntled customer or employee today? How did it go? Did you achieve the results you desired?

These are all examples where a learned process of positive negotiation would be helpful. I was surprised the first time this was pointed out to me. I always thought of negotiation as a formal affair between high-powered professionals beating each other up to get what they wanted. That is a misconception held by many people. Every aspect of your life can be simplified just by understanding and implementing the essential elements of negotiation.

Here you will learn some of the essential negotiation elements to use when you are faced with situations that could become difficult if they’re not handled correctly.

1. Communicate Clearly

This is the most important element on the list. Your communication is the primary tool you have to express your thoughts, opinions and desires. If you don’t communicate effectively you will lose a critical advantage in your negotiations.

Also remember that speech is not the only form of communication. Your actions and body language, although silent, speak volumes. Make sure you are aware of how you are perceived by someone watching you. Your silent communications may be sending out a message entirely different from your intentions. A good way to identify this is to video tape yourself while speaking or during a meeting. You can also watch yourself in a mirror as you practice discussing the issues at hand.

2. Know your goals

Just like any project you start, it is important to know what your intended outcome or goals are at the end. Take some time before negotiating and decide what you want to achieve at the end of the negotiation. Additionally, think about what you are willing to give up to reach those goals. It is important to know your bottom line before the negotiation begins.

As you are making these decisions, remember your goals must be realistic. Stand in the other party’s shoes and think about whether your goals or requirements are something you could live with. If not, you must reassess your goals to be in line with what is realistic for you to achieve any success in your negotiation.

3. Treat everyone involved with respect.

Being the bully during a negotiation will not gain you any points. As soon as you start attacking the other parties, their defenses will go up and your chances of successful communication have been dashed. Instead, treat everyone involved with respect when addressing them, listen to what they are saying and take their situation into consideration.

Now, that doesn’t mean you should cave when someone doesn’t agree with you. It simply means that the goal is for everyone involved to act in a civilized and productive manner. Stand your ground, but do so without antagonizing the other parties involved. Now that you have read these rules, take some time to consider your past negotiations. Have you been breaking any of these rules? How can you make changes to your current negotiation style to improve your results?

To your success,

Swanie Brandt

How Your Future Can Rob Your Present

Going after your passion and Focusing on your goals are the corner stones of success. That is a common knowledge: one should focus and concentrate in order to achieve maximum results. It gets a lot of emphasize lately.

But there is a trump in this process of success. It is so easy to fall into it, that it should be spoken out loads.

Your goals are in the future.

At the Present, What you experience as your life, is the road you walk to achieve your goals.

Hence, your future determined your present.

So, the big question is what are you willing to do in order to achieve your goals?
Are you willing to have “bad” life now, for limited time, in order to have “good” life later?

Here lay the trump. We are sure that we are smart enough and logic enough to think in cost-benefit terms, to know our borders and have the common sense to make the right choices. “I have my limits”, “not in any costs”, “I have my values” etc.
But never the less, we fall into the trump of “too much focusing”.

Here is a story about a man who decided to go to the beach to collect some sea shells. It was a beautiful sunny day, few days after a storm. The beach was full of shells and small stones.
Our man takes a basket, and he is going along the beach, face down, looking for special shells and rear stones.

The beach is beautiful, white send; skies are blue, and few seagulls flying around. A pleasant wind and the sound of the waves complete the perfect scenery.

Our man is focusing in his mission. Time passed, his basket is half full. More people arrive at the shore; children are playing, the sun get hotter and the waves much higher. The basket starts to be heavy, the man sweats, but he would not stop. So many beautiful pieces here, he just needs to pick them up. Tomorrow they might be swiped to the sea. More time passed, it is afternoon, he became tired, he did not stop to drink or to eat, the basket is heavy, and he has to go through all the way back. Still he feels lucky to have these treasures with “no effort” at all.

At evening, he gets back home tired but satisfied. He suffers from sunstroke, and all he wants is to go to sleep.

At the time he was walking on the beach, he was so focused on finding beautiful shells and rear stones that his head was bending down, his eyes were looking at the ground, so he could not notice how beautiful this day was. He could not see the blue sky, he did not pay attention to other people, and he did not hear the seagulls or the sound of the waves.

More than that, when he came home, he was so tiered that he missed his family too. But still he is happy with his achievements, he thinks “tomorrow is another day”, I can go to enjoy the sea sure some other time, I will enjoy with my family tomorrow etc.

This walking on the beach is the metaphor for ones life.

His passion and Focusing on his goal to collect as many rear shells and stones he could, theft his life from him. The problem is that it is not something he was aware of when he was walking on the beach.
It could hold a long time until he will notice that his future have stolen his present, and it could be too late. This beautiful sunny day and other sunny days are gone.

So, the big question is what are you willing to do in order to achieve your goals?
Are you willing to have “bad” life now, for limited time, in order to have “good” life later?

I admit, this is a provocative question. Life is about choices. Choices could be conscious or unconscious. You set a goal, you focus, you concentrate, and you persist.
Soon your Automatic pilot will take control over your common sense, your limits and priorities and could take control even over your values in order to achieve that goal. Be aware; every thing is about proportions. Do not lose your present for the future.

Advanced Presentation Skills Training

Being able to communicate effectively is a great asset for any employee and can help build your
career. To present at an advanced level is easy when you know how. Following these 12 points will
help you get started:

Think about your structure: remember to tell us, tell us and tell us. That means getting your message over 3 times. Once is not enough if it’s important. You’ll receive a circular on average 4 times before you ‘see’ it. In the same way you need to repeat your main message at least 3 times if you want your audience to ‘hear’ it.
You will need a good opening to grab our attention. Please don’t start with ‘hello my name is…and I’m here to talk to you about…’ This is a thoroughly over-used start.
Say what your purpose of this presentation is and what you want to achieve; it helps you if you use an agenda slide.
Put your main reason (to persuade us) up front followed by your less strong arguments. Please remember there are never 7 good reasons for doing anything. Three is more than enough for the time you have.Avoid the formula, ‘method, result conclusion,’ if possible.
We are less interested in the ‘how,’ than the ‘why’ and the ‘WHAT’. If you are getting into the ‘how’ ask yourself, ‘does my audience really need to know this?’
Think about the words you use to emphasize your message. Your words reveal a lot about you. And we’ll make assumptions and have opinions based on the words you say and how you say them. When it sounds like a shopping list be sure that clapping is zapping.
Think about the pictures you create to support your message.Most of us use visual recall. So think about your slide deck – add pictures where you can. And remember that words create mind pictures too. So ask yourself what you want to leave us with.
The words you use affect the way you deliver them – and the way you are perceived. They also reflect how you think. So get personal – use “you”, “we”, “I”. There’s nothing more boring than long sentences with passive verbs. Your audience want to know that you are talking to them. So just do it and they’ll love you for recognising them.
Try to stick to the timing. If you are asked to prepare a 30 minute presentation then prepare 25 minutes only. This allows for questions, mishaps and delays.
Try not to end with, ‘thank you any questions’. Everyone does this; how do you differentiate yourself?
Words are not visuals, and visuals are not cue cards. Try to avoid whole sentences on your visuals otherwise you will be tempted to read them. Please try to use font size 28 to limit the information on your slide.
Try to prepare a maximum of one slide per two minutes. Or if you prefer no slides. Or come with flip chart paper and try that instead.